Ailsa Cavers

Born in the UK in 1988, studied fine art (sculpture and installation) at Bordeaux's Ecole des Beaux Arts before attending Luca School of Arts. 

Personal Practise

My practise engages with the production and transmission of material intelligence or savoir-faire. I explore the contemporary artist’s desire to (re)acquire these craft skills in a transdisciplinary age in which one might position the artist – in opposition to the artisan – as a deskilled knowledge-worker. The modes of transfer of a craft, of a hands-on skill, are at the root of my work, be it the traditional schema of hierarchical transmission from master to apprentice, the guide book for the Sunday painter or video tutorials.
I hope to pose questions concerning the artist’s relationship with production and re-production, to preservation and to destruction, often using the copy as both a motif and a method in my work (in the form of photographic reproduction, contact images or the use of moulds, repetition and re-use of certain elements).

Master Dissertation

My essay addresses two axes concerning the image: a possible materiality of the image (be it a photographic image or a broader acceptance of the word) and the notion inherent to the image which is that of the copy or reproduction. 
How do what we understand as images materialise in the physical world? What is a possible materiality of the image? How does a “materiality of the image” relate to its representational or mimetic qualities? 

Leaving behind the historical dichotomy of photography relating to sculpture, my dissertation aims to give a wider view on the idea of the image and its possible materiality. I analyse both artists' production (Stan Brakhage, Guiseppe Penone, Bruno Botella) as well as situations relating to the subject at hand (the reproduction of the Lascaux Caves, the 2013 re-enactment of the 1969 exhibition When Attitudes Become Form).

Rather than evoking sculpture in relation to photography, my text deals with the interrelation, the intertwining, the blurring of boundaries that could be possible between what we consider “image” (be it photographic or not) and physical manifestations (be it sculpture or not). Using the notion of the "material image" I wanted to question the ontological and historical barrier which exists between the sculptural and the pictorial. My text is geared to open up new pathways for contemporary practises which seem to sit on the fence between the two- and three-dimensional and also refuse ideas of medium-specificity. 

 

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Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Ailsa Cavers
Academic Portraiture (Sint Lukas)
Ailsa Cavers
Academic Portraiture (de Appel)
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